A POWERFUL FORCE

Electricity makes so many things possible, and is ever present in our homes, at work and at play, we often take it for granted. But because it is so powerful, it's important that we always exercise caution when using it.

Make this and every season a safe one by remembering:

FARM SAFETY

Research shows (and every farmer knows) that farming is a hazardous occupation. These hazards include electric shock, which can cause farm worker fatalities. Many farm workers have been seriously injured as a result of contacting power lines while moving or installing equipment. With the widespread use of electricity on today's farming operations, we believe you should be aware of the potential dangers involved in using it.

Electric-powered mowers and other tools should not be used in the rain, on wet grass or in wet conditions. Inspect power tools and electric lawn mowers before each use for frayed power cords, broken plugs and cracked or broken housings. If damaged, stop using it immediately. Repair it or replace it. Always use an extension cord marked for outdoor use and rated for the power needs of your tools. Remember to unplug all portable power tools when not in use. Since metal ladders conduct electricity, watch out for overhead wires and power lines.

THE 10 FOOT RULE

The 10 foot rule refers to the distance extending ten feet in every direction from any power line. It's the distance you should observe when you're working outdoors with equipment or machinery such as a crane, forklift, backhoe, dump truck, television antenna, drilling rig or skid loader. It's an important rule to remember.

WHEN POWER GOES OFF

DOWNED POWER LINES

STAY AWAY FROM DOWNED POWER LINES AND BROKEN POLES!
No matter how well Kiwash Electric Cooperative is prepared, we cannot avoid occasional downed power lines. Weather conditions and accidents are the main causes of downed power lines. If you come across a downed power line or broken pole you should stay as far away from it as possible. Treat all downed wires as if they are "live" and you could be electrocuted. Never attempt to touch or move a downed power line or to remove trees from power lines. Remember even a "dead" line may be re-energized unexpectedly by automatic equipment. All downed power lines and broken poles should be reported to the Cooperative immediately.

We will send someone out to make sure the line is de-energized, repair it and restore power as quickly as possible. If the wire belongs to another utility company we will notify them of the problem. Please stay away from downed lines even if you know they are not electric lines. The downed line could have come in contact with an electric line when it fell causing the downed line to be hot.

Electricity is a powerful force in all our lives. It makes so many things possible, and is so ever present in our homes, at work and at play, we often take it for granted. But because it is so powerful, it's important that we always exercise caution when using it. ACCIDENTS HAPPEN

ELECTRICAL ACCIDENTS

Even when we're being as careful as we can, accidents happen. If someone does get shocked, you can help them -- and yourself -- by remembering the following tips:

For more information visit the National Electric Safety Foundation.

GENERATOR SAFETY

BEFORE YOU INSTALL A GENERATOR - READ THIS PLEASE!
A storm or high winds can knock out your electric service leaving you without power. A generator will definitely help avoid any loss or inconvenience resulting from an extensive power outage and our staff can assist you with information on purchasing the right generator for your needs. However, unless safely installed a generator can cause serious injury or death to power line workers or to your family due to back-feeding. Improper installation also risks damage to the generator when electrical service is restored.

AVOID DANGER OF BACK-FEEDING - USE A TRANSFER SWITCH
If the generator is not properly wired into the home there is a danger of back-feeding electricity into Kiwash Electric Cooperative’s system. This is very dangerous and could result in serious injury or death to anyone coming into contact with electric lines while working to restore power in an emergency.

To properly install a standby generator large enough to power a whole house, a double-throw disconnect is needed to isolate your new temporary power source from the main power lines feeding your home. A double-throw switch must be sized according to the rating of your service entrance equipment. To insure proper installation of a standby generator and compliance with electrical code, please contact a qualified, licensed electrician.

UNDERSTANDING THE RISK AND AVOIDING TRAGIC ACCIDENTS
When you use electricity from Kiwash Electric Cooperative Services' lines, the transformer at your location steps the voltage down from 7,200 to the 120 and 240 volts used in your home. When you run a generator without a double-throw switch installed on your system, you may feed 120 volt current back into the transformer. The transformer then steps the voltage up to 7,200 potentially giving a lethal shock to anyone who contacts a damaged power line that may be lying on the ground. Think of a suddenly energized downed power line and the lineperson repairing it, or a downed power line on a fence and the neighbor's animals brushing against it. Please consider the safety of your neighbors and their children, and have your generator installed by a licensed electrician.

HOME SAFE HOME

Here are some simple checks you can make in your home to help ensure your family's safety. For more information please visit the National Electrical Safety Foundation web site at www.nesf.org.

CARBON MONOXIDE SAFETY TIPS